Analysis of Reverse Speech on Rense radio

I have decided to provide an analysis of the reversals played by David Oates on the Jeff Rense show on June 27 2018. The audio of the show can be found here. https://www.davidoates.com/shows/ I have not chosen this show specifically other than it is the most recent. I am frustrated over the errors, debatable quality, probable coincidences and inconsistences of reversals that are presented publicly by people, even at the ‘highest level’, whether on YouTube or radio shows. Also addressing someone personally and individually about errors has always been to no avail in the past. 

If one studied audio of forward speech, one would hear all kinds of distortions and imprecisions, and so this would also occur in Reverse Speech. But one needs to be aware of what is acceptable when addressing distortions and imprecisions in Reverse Speech. One needs to understand linguistic parameters. Yet, a person won’t even get to this point if he is not aware of the true level of linguistic errors in a reverse string of words. There is a great deal of projection occurring.

And, even where a reversal appears linguistically valid, it may just be coincidental, particularly if it is short. Most reversals played by David, for example, range from two to five words, with occasional ones over that. Three-word reversals are very common. Many are unremarkable. 

Take for example, the statement ‘This is it”. You have two words with the function of pronouns, and an auxiliary verb. Two words have two phonemes, and one word has three, total seven phonemes. The shortness of the statement and of the words themselves make this unremarkable. However, combine that with an incorrect phoneme, an irregular stress pattern, and irregular connection of phonemes, then you probably have something that is worthless. This example is examined below.

So, a first point is understanding what is truly imprecise about language at a phonemic, syllabic, word, sentence and prosodic level. This takes careful investigation. Then, one needs to apply what one has discovered to see if it can reasonably fall into linguistic parameters of speech, as well as the particular character and nature of Reverse Speech. One also needs to be aware that short word-like strings can be coincidental. With the massive bits of language produced each day around the world, there will be word-like examples, which are simply coincidental, no matter how much one thinks he can interpret its meaning. 

With that said, one could speculate that the subconscious of the speaker is imposing some control at times over the linguistic components of the verbalisations of the speaker. However, complete control is not possible, and errors are evident, say two or three obviously incorrect phonemes in a string of 20 – 25 in an otherwise linguistically reasonable utterance. If that be the case, then you might have a genuine reversal. But, assuming Reverse Speech is real, who will determine that? One would need both a level of linguistic knowledge and a deep understanding of the phenomenon. 

The first eight were found by David from Trump’s Singapore summit. The remainder come from a person in Canada whom David uses to find reversals for his shows. David checks the reversals and selects suitable ones for public airing.

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RS: I’m very careful (Trump at Singapore media conference)
FS: Well thank you very much everybody, appreciate it we’re getting ready to go back
I’m very – [you very mu]ch The FS /v/ disappears in reverse, and its position comes at /r/ in RS [very].  To be precise, the beginning of RS [ery] is not /v/, but more of an /m/. However, it can  easily sound like /v/ to listeners.
careful – [well thank] Although [th] may still be perceived in reverse, [f] is reasonable. This is okay.
It certainly approximates the words. There is more of an /m/ in place of /v/, and there is the minor f/th ambiguity, but in light of the knowledge that FS language is imprecise, and can be heard as such on audio, permits further consideration of its possible value. Also, the question begs: If the subconscious is communicating through vocal sounds/language, why should we assume that it will be entirely successful in producing all of the phonemes precisely? I will address this in the future.
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RS: Failed business
FS: Countless people died in the conflict including tens of thousands of brave Americans Yet while the armistice was agreed to, the war never ended …
failed – [brave] – [fail] reasonably occurs, with the vowel more like that in [air].  A /d/ final cannot be heard in reverse, There is a FS /b/ articulation occurring, but that is difficult to pick up in reverse. In FS, /d/ assimilation to the initial consonant of the following word can occur. 
business – thou[sands of] FS /v/ can be perceived as /b/. This is acceptable.
Note: behind FS of [thou]sand, [life] may be perceived, although the FS [th] can also still be heard as [th] in reverse. It can be heard more or less as [th] or [f] depending on where one cuts it. Except for that imprecision, it may be viewed as [business life].
Although imprecise, it may be acceptable as [failed business] or even [failed business life]. 
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FS: This is it
FS: This isn’t.
This – i[sn’t] This sounds like [niz], with a very short amount of frication from the release of /t/ in the FS.
is it – [this i]sn’t This is acceptable. Note that stress is on [is] however, and not [it] in the reversal. Also, the nonseparation of [thi[s i]s, although normal in speech, is overly intense, causing it to sound unnatural.
We have [nizizit]. Poorly formed. 

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RS: You live with the shit
But peace is always worth the effort especially in this case. They should have been done years ago, they should have been resolved …
you [re]solved – This is acceptable.
live with – [have been] There is an /n/, but this may be perceived a /l/. There is no /w/, so it is more like [nivit]. There is some sense of an unreleased /t/ final. The /v/ allows for perception of [with]. 
the shit – [they should] This is acceptable.
This is questionable with the obvious /n/. One might ask, is it meant to be these words?

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RS: Over see God
FS: And where the light of peace chases away the darkness of war
see God – [darkness] – In the FS Trump dropped the /n/ so that it sounds like [darkess]. [see] is from [ess]. God is from [dark], however it sounds like [krod].  Perhaps the closest word would be [cried].
over – [of war] [ver] comes at [of]. FS [war] has a breathy /h/ ending, so this sounds like [her-ro].  The FS /r/ would need to be cut off to get [over]
This sounds like [herrovaseekrod]. 
If one were to cut off the beginning [herr], there would be something sounding like [over, see, cried
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RS: They give us a limit
FS: So it’s an honour to be with everybody today, the media, it’s a big gathering of media
They give us i[t’s a big gath]ering This approximates it, although the FS /b/ can still be heard in reverse, and FS /g/ has weakened from a stop to more of a velar /h/. It sounds like it in an overall listening, but flaws are revealed in a more detailed listening. 
a limit – [the media] This is acceptable.
The reversal certainly approximates the words; a couple of phonemes are not as precise as they seem to be. It is a debatable point whether it has value as a genuine reversal. _______________________________________________________________________________
RS: Wisdom drove me round it
FS: people understand that this is something very important to
Jeff Rense pointed out correctly that it is not [round it].
wisdom – importa[nt to] [to] produces [wis], or likely in this case [wes]. The remainder is the /n/ sound in the FS which produces an /n/ final in reverse. Therefore the closest word is [west’n] or in other words [western]. 
drove me – ver[y import]ant This is acceptable. There is a /p/ in the FS, but in this case it is light and one may assume assimilation of /v/ to the bilabial /m/.
round it – [thing ver]y This sounds similar to [rung it] with the /ng/ from [ng] in the FS. 
This seems to be word-like, West’n drove me rung it, but nonsensical. 

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RS: America get habit
FS: Otto did not die in vain, he had a lot to do with us speaking here today thank thank you very much
America – [thank you very mu]ch [Ameri] can be heard behind [you very mu]. [ca] is actually [get] from FS [thank]. Therefore it sounds like [Ameriget]. 
get – [thank] This is acceptable.
habit – [today] There is a /d/, not a /b/, so it is like [had it]. 
This is not valid.
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RS: Gotta sly be bad
FS: A some point that I have to be honest that I used to say this during my campaign …
Trump talks about wanting to bring soldiers home.
Jeff Rense suggested it was you’ve been bad. There is indeed another syllable, you.
gotta – [that I] There is no initial /g/. FS [th] disappears to get [otta] The reversal actually starts earlier than the documented section, and sounds something like [vyatta]. 
sly – b[e hones]t This is acceptable. However, there is a further syllable at b[e] which is [you].
be – [to b]e this is ok except that there is an unreleased /t/ final which is drowned out by the initial sound of the following word.
bad – [I have t]hat There is a /v/ that can be perceived as /b/.
There is a lack of evidence for [gotta]. The remaining [sly be bad] may just be coincidental. Three short words. _________________________________________________________________________________

RS: and mud by you
FS: we have done that, Secretary Pompeo has really been doing a fantastic job … (Trump)
by you [we have] There is a clear /v/ rather than /b/, therefore we get what sounds like [vayou]. The closest word is probably [value] with a light /l/, that not articulated on the palate, which is possible, hence the [y] sound. 
and mud [done tha]t There is no /m/. It sounds like [an’ nod] with American pronunciation of [o]. The closest words would be [and not].

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RS: Here is a census
FS: to immediately begin the process necessary
Trump talking about establishing a space force.
Here is a – nec[essary] This is acceptable.
census – [process nec]ssary This is acceptable.
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RS: Yeah I got nukes
FS: As long as it’s an American rich person that’s good, okay?
Yeah I got – [okay]
nukes – that[‘s good] – /n/ or /d/ can be perceived at FS /d/.
I find this, although reasonably there, unimpressive. Not a good quality reversal, and may be coincidental.
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RS: All bad
FS: The Democrats forced that law upon our nation
all bad – [that law] There is no /b/. The sounds are like [dead], with a released /d/ final. 
This is clearly not there.

The word [but] seems to occur behind [up]on. /t/ is glottal rather than alveolar, but that is fine. So, the words are probably closest to [but all dead]. It’s probably coincidental gibberish nevertheless.
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RS: All lies, said all lies 
FS: I hate the children being taken away. The Democrats have to change their law. That’s their law. (Trump).
all lies – that[s their law] [s their] creates something more like [lads]. There is still a stop consonant sound from [th], although it is easy to gloss over the stop in favour of only /s/. 
said – For a word like [said] to occur here, the /s/ would have to be removed from the documented [lies]. If /s/ is not removed one either gets (ted) from the FS onset of /s/ remaining, or something like [hed] if the /s/ onset is not included.
all lies – [their law] /s/ final is not really evident. There is a [th] ending with a short sibilant ‘added’ to the end. [all] sounds more like [o] with FS [their l]aw like [lathe]. Therefore the sounds are similar to [olathe-s]. 
This is gibberish.
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RS: We’re gonna get you, scum
FS: ten votes, we can’t get ‘em from (Trump)
we’re gonna – g[et ‘em from] This comes out as something that approximates [mafronei], with ‘e[m] silent, and /t/ giving perception of /n/. 
get you – [we can’t g]et /n/ is silent, /c/ is not articulated, and so this gives the listener a sense of a /t/ for [get]. You comes from [we].
scum – te[n votes] – this produces something like [skon]. /v/ disappears. 
This is poorly documented, and badly misheard.
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RS: In their famous office
FS: supposed to be a friendly picture, that was put out …  (Trump)
in their – f[riendly] This is acceptable. [th] would naturally assimilate to /n/.
famous – suppo[sed to be a f]riendly This is acceptable.
office – [suppo]sed This is acceptable.

There are words that may come before the documented reversal:
Why not do it; the ship in their famous office
why not – wa[s put out] The FS /p/ is silent. The frication from the /s/ was responsible for the final /t/ here and the /d/ in RS [do].
do it – [that was] Normally, one should not cut an /s/ to get a /t/ or /d/, which can occur. However, the nature of it. I feel. Is different than most other cases. Therefore, I still present it as a possibility.
the ship – [picture] The [ure] creates some sense of the article [the].

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RS: Wear the halo people/We’re the halo people
FS: oh that’s nice, Justin’s giving a .. and they talked about how they won’t be bullied, how the.., and I said what’s this all about?
Trump talking about the meeting in Canada.
wear the – [how the ..] Trump moved towards a rounded vowel when articulating [the …] allowing for /w/ in [wear]. [how th] sounds most like [they] in reverse on closer listening, but this is missed in an overall listening. [they] doesn’t make sense, however, and [the] is easily distorted in speech. [thy] could also be considered, as it is appropriate with [halo].
halo – [bullied] /d/ is silent. /b/ can be perceived at the end from FS /b/, but perception allows it to assimilate into the labial /p/ of the next word [people].
people – [won’t be b]ullied initial /p/ comes at the release of [be] and movement towards [b]ullied. 2nd /p/ is weaker and comes as the rounded vowel in [won’t] moves towards the [b]e. The ending [le] also comes at [wo].
This is possible and could be considered as wear the halo people or wear thy halo people, perhaps a criticism towards the holier than thou attitude of other leaders.
RS: business a chance
FS: that’s nice Justin’s giving
business a – J[ustin’s giv] The FS /v/ provides perception of a labial, but not /b/, so the initial of the word is weak.
chance – that[‘s nice J]ustin – [ch] perceivable from [c J]. This is acceptable.
This could be considered as a possibility, but not a certainty.
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RS: My gift America
FS: Thank you very much, ‘pprecia … (Trump)
my gift – the audio is poor; it may be heard as this.
America – [thank you very mu]ch It may be perceived as [America]. However, the FS /v/ at which /r/ is perceived can also sound like a /v/, and a /t/ ending can also be heard from FS [th].
As audio quality is reduced, this must be treated with uncertainty.
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RS: You’ll be private
FS: It’s about keeping families together (Trump)
After playing David and Jeff agreed the [‘ll] wasn’t there.
You’ll be – [keeping] There is a sense of [you be], although some perception of a velar /k/ occurs at the beginning, which is from the FS /ng/.
private – [it’s about] Sense of /p/ occurs at FS /t/, and some sense of /v/ occurs at FS /b/. This is acceptable.
There is a potential reversal immediately before it:
They could seal mouth
They could – [togeth]er
seal mouth – [families] – [outh] is imprecise, therefore making the reversal dubious. However, it was interesting to consider in light of the use of [private].
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RS: America’s in all the shit
FS: They said oh that’s so terrible
After playing, David and Jeff did not like [America’s].
America’s – [so terrible] [c] occurs at the alveolar /t/. A /d/ sound can be heard, although it is perceivable as [c]. /m/ occurs at /b/. The main issue here is using the full /s/ as rather than a schwa, it makes it sound like [us]. If the /s/ is removed, although imprecise, the word is more reasonable.
in all [oh tha]t’s although one can perceive /n/ it is more accurately t/th.
the shit – [they said] this is acceptable.
Rather than the documented reversal we should consider:
that it could be America, but no /s/, with the /s/ beginning [stood/still]. Or, that only the initial part of /s/ belongs to America, and the rest of /s/ begins [stood]. The vowel may not sound like that for the word [stood] if pronounced as a single word, however, in a speech string the change in vowel would be plausible. So we would have [stood all the shit/still all the shit].
America/America’s stood all the shit/America – still all the shit
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RS: Help, help, help
FS: We were probably going to war with North Korea, if we did …quiet quiet, quiet.
help, help, help – [quiet, quiet, quiet] Although at a surface level it sounds like this, the final consonants are ambiguous. They could be /f/ or /k/.
I found a reversal that follows on from this:
You’re dead you bitch

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RS: I would make it early
FS: He learnt you can’t do that
Trump talking about Trudeau’s news conference when he was on a plane leaving Canada.
I would – [do that] – [th] and /t/ disappear in the FS allowing for a sense of these words.
make it – learn[t you can’t] There is no /m/. There is an /n/ followed be /t/ in the FS. If the /n/ is localised, it will sound like [naked]. With the /t/ included, it allows perception to hear it as [take it]. 
early – he lear]nt This is acceptable.

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RS: I’ll be bad 
FS: we got some bad people
I’ll be – [people] This is possible, although an unreleased /p/ is discernible on close listening which cannot be attributed to the beginning of the following word.
bad – [bad] The initial and final consonants are ambiguous. Perception of the word is possible, however, perception of an initial alveolar and final labial is also possible (the reverse of the word).
This is a dubious reversal.
I found an amusing sounding reversal after this. Its weakness is the lack of the verb ‘be’, and the fact that [nn] is really more like [ll]. Himmel reminds one of the German interjection Gott im Himmel!
RS: Must I/eye a winner. Himmel! 
FS Let me tell you, we got some bad people
must I/eye a – w[e got some] [I a} comes behind w[e go] where the /g/ is silent.
winner – [tell you w]e Although it can sound like [nn], it is more [ll]. This is the one issue with the reversal, apart from the missing ‘be’ verb.
himmel – [let me]
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RS: God bless you
FS: There’ll be setbacks
Comey saying that America will be OK (even if they have Trump).
God – set[back] There isn’t actually a /d/ final. The FS /b/ is silent. A sense of /p/ occurs on release of /t/ in FS [set]. To get /g/ initial, the beginning has to be cut off. If it were included it would be [sco],
bless – [set] The FS /t/ creates the /l/, while a /p/ is perceivable on release of the FS /t/.
you – b[e] set A sense of [you] can occur if cut at the right point. With the /b/ fully included from FS [be], it can sound like [him].
This is dubious and can be heard as other strings of speech. For example one can get [scopeless]. 
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RS: Hillary laughs
FS: he’s failed a year later
Comey talks about Trump wanting to stop illegal immigration.
Hillary – he‘s failed a [year la]ter [illary] can be perceived from this, so it is not too bad. However, the documenter cut off the /d/ coming from [later]. If the beginning was included, it would sound like [her dillary]. In addition, [a y]ear produces another syllable not documented, which sound like [you].
laughs – he[‘s failed] [led] produces /l/. The word is acceptable. However, as mentioned, there is a discernible [you] before it. Also, in this case, the /s/ should be removed in favour of [you laugh]. The /s/ arguably belongs to [see] which follows (falls into gibberish after that).
This may be a case where the subconscious was indeed thinking Hillary you laugh, but the /d/ needed to be not included. This presents a problem, however. One can cut words strings at certain points and come up with different words.
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RS: Their government suck now 
FS: that the American story is an upward sloping line, constant progress …
After playing, David didn’t feel happy about the reversal, but accepted its validity.
Their – prog[ress] There is an /s/ initial, which was cut off by the documenter. An alveolar /t/ or /d/ can always be produced is the /s/ is cut off, but the onset of /s/ retained. Documenters need to be aware of this. [their] is not there.
government – cons[tant prog] – [gov] can be perceived in [prog], however the rest is [nit]. In FS, this word is often distorted, however, without any evidence of /m/, it is dubious.
suck – [cons]tant There is an /n/ after /s/. A velar final occurs, but is fricative in nature. This is a poor example.
now – [line] This approximates the word.

For the reasons above, it is not sound as a reversal.

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RS: That bible beat the crime, he lost it
FS: That was President Obama’s decision about whether to tell the American people about that (Comey)
that bible – peo[ple about that] The /b/s do not come at the position of the FS /p/ and /b/ in the FS. [b]ible comes at the release of [about], and bi[b]le comes at the articulation of the peop[le]. Perception of labial /b/s is evident. The word is there.
beat the crime – A[merican peop]le [p]eople is silent in the RS leaving the /n/ from America[n]. This leaves a sound like [ni] for RS [the]. This is not an issue as this word is typically altered substantially in FS. The silent /p/ there allows an alveolar perception of the final sound in [beat]. [crime] comes from [meric] which is pretty much a constant.
he lost it – [to tell the] A general listening gives he lost. Careful listening will reveal an alveolar /t/ which can make he sound like it. This sound is lost very easily, however. [lo] actually sounds like [lie]. It is only the [st] from FS [t]ell, that allows perception of [lost]. [it] comes from [to].

Following on from this reversal is what appears to be more words. These are not as clear as the first part of the reversal above, but they are worth investigating. There are different ways to approach it. This is one way:
[lost] wouldn’t be a natural ending to the reversal due to the prosody, unless speech continued immediately after it (hence, [it] sounds like a natural ending). I will assume [lost] as the ending of the first part, or, alternatively [lie], and assume the sibilance after it is a moment of gibberish, but that the reversal actually continues on.
RS: didn’t know why produce system
didn’t know – [whether to] One can get a sense of /n/ at FS [th] for both reverse words. Whether there is meant to be an /n/ for [didn’t] is debatable however.
why – ab[out w]hether Sounds more line [wa] but this quite normal in a string of speech.
produce – de[cision ab] – this is not clearly articulated. There is a sense of a labialised consonant at the beginning, and one must assume it is meant to be [pro]. The RS /d/ is like a [dz], but this is normal as the word can be articulated with an alveolar or a fricative. [c] comes at FS [c].
system – Oba[ma’s dec]ision This is acceptable
One must be very careful with the use of [crime] as the reverse of America as it will often be coincidental. It is fairly common that there appears to be a verb before it also. There needs be more content information. The use of bible and the way it was constructed from the FS sounds, makes it worthy of note. A general listening gives he lost. Careful listening will note an alveolar /t/ which can make he sound like it. [lo] actually sounds like [lie]. It is only the [st] from FS [t]ell, that allows perception of [lost].

So, it can sound like: That bible beat the crime, he lost, didn’t know why produce system 
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RS: had a gun awful
FS: … responsible for I’m not gonna
had a [g[onna] This is acceptable There is an alveolar tap to get a sound like /d/.
gun I[‘m not g]onna This is acceptable. The FS /m/ assimilates to /n/.
awful [le for I]’m This is acceptable.

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RS: They were lost 
FS: This was an discussion between a UK host and another person about Muslim issues.
These words come behind [tolerant]. The other person also said [tolerant] and it clearly came out as [never lost] although FS /r/ is simply giving an impression of RS /v/. The same occurs in [they were lost]. There is still an /n/ beginning, but the FS /r/ is less perceivable as /v/ and one may get the impression of /w/ instead as in [were].
These probably should be considered as coincidental.

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RS: Asleep, that is America, we love you
FS: everybody will move their embassies there, you’ll see (Netanyahu)
After playing, David (rightly so) stated that [asleep] should be discarded. Jeff stated that [that is] (also correctly) wasn’t there, and this was accepted by David. I will investigate it with ‘asleep’, but keep the two words before America as the word before is essential to be able to hear the /a/ in [A]merica. Otherwise, it will sound something like [Themeri …]That is – [ssies there] The closest words are probably [as this].
America – will move [their emba]ssies Ameri is clear from [eir emba]. The ending gets somewhat lost in the [th]eir. Elision of endings as articulation moves to the next word is normal in FS, so I accept the possibility of the word here. There are two syllables that have not been included in the documented reversal. These come behind w[ill mov]e. The [ov] produces an ambiguous sound, but could be [will], and the [ill m] produces a sound similar to [mo], as if [move] was going to said but cut short.
we love you – [everybody wi]ll [we] comes from [y w]. [love] can be perceived from [bod]. The alveolar /d/ provides a sense of alveolar /l/ and labial /b/ produces a sense of labial /v/. [you] is acceptable as [ver] disappears but lends some rounding of the mouth after /e/ in the FS, and as the tongue moves high front, we can get a sense of [y].
Perhaps it could be considered as As this America will mo.. we love you 
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RS: You’re gonna kiss, God will find this
FS: sit down for godsake and negotiate (Netanyahu)
you’re – neg[o]tiate The beginning of the reversal needs to be trimmed as it starts with a [j] sound from FS [ti].
gonna – [and neg] This is acceptable
kiss -[sake] This is acceptable
God – [God] – This is something like [dzarg] The fricative sound comes from the movement toward /s/ in the FS in [sake].
will find – [down for] It sounds like [find]. This is aided by its length before the beginning of the next word. It is arguable, however, that an /n/ is not there, leaving [will fight]. It is more likely to be [find] if the following word is [us], with the fi[nd] represented by si[t d]own in the FS. There is a more centralised, less pronounced vowel instead of [u]s, but this is acceptable.
this – [sit] This is acceptable
[God] isn’t there. The rest, possibly is, with alternatives for the last two words.
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RS: see the panic
FS: I would think it had to be somebody from …
see – t[o be s]omebody /b/ is silent. This is OK
the – h[ad t]o this is OK
panic – thi[nk it ha]d The release of [ha] in the FS before /d/ gives a perceptual sense of /p/. [n] can be perceived around [t d], and [k] can be heard in [n].
This is acceptable.
However, it appears that there are words before it. [must] can be heard and a strange name before [must]. I will assume the strange name is gibberish, and that it is [must see the panic].
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RS: Barack ordered sarin
FS: to an all powerful (Obama)
Obama was talking about the need for people to surrender their rights to an international order.
Barack – [ll power]ful The strength of the /r/ and the movement toward /f/ can allow some sense of a possible /b/. There is an unreleased /p/ that is evident as a final, so it is more like [barap]
ordered – [to an a]ll A sense of RS /d/ arises from FS /n/. There is a sense of [or] from [a]ll, The ending becomes something similar to [doo]. The [t]o disappears. There isn’t actually a /d/ final; however, as [ed] isn’t always distinct in FS, this not be much of an issue here. Alternatively, it sounds like [ought to],  with the /t/ articulated as a tap alveolar, which is quite normal.
sarin – [their rights] [ts] in [rights] produces a consonant after /s/ in reverse. This can be perceived as /k/, if not /t/. FS [th] can give a sense of /n/. Therefore, it is closest to [skarin].
With the [sk], the reversal is not valid.
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RS: ‘n I’ll be birth dead
FS: … that there are people uncomfortable with that idea.
(I assume that David said ‘I’ll’ rather than ‘all’).
This is Justin Trudeau talking about Islamophobia.
Jeff Rense suggested that it is we’ll all be birth dead. David accepted that.

There is another word-like strong immediately before it and joining it:    What is the most clear is: all be fuck ….. be birth dead. At some point inbetween, the first reversal ends and the second begins. Where this occurs is debatable. This should not be interpreted as a single continuous reversal, but two reversals, back to back.

First of all, this type of occurrence is common in RS. One reversal ends and another begins without pause. After the /k/ in [fuck], there is an /n/, a vowel, and a possible /l/. This comes behind peo[ple un]comfortable. In the RS, the FS /p/ is silent, but there is an increase in amplitude at this point which is matched by what follows, but not be what is before. Around this point, one may also hear a difference in voice quality. At the point peop[le u]n, there is either two vowel-like sounds, or a vowel + /l/. One way to approach this is to end and begin in the middle of this:

All be fucked now/Are we fucked now? All be birth dead 

Although there is no clear [ed], I am assuming its existence here and assimilation into the following /n/. Obviously the word assumed to be [now] is short, and doesn’t have a natural ending. This is because the 2nd reversal has ‘taken over’. It is like two people in a conversation where one cuts off the first person before they fully express their message.  

An alternative is:                                                                                                                                     All be fuckin’. Now be birth dead  

Is this supposed to represent [now], or [‘n I’ll] or [‘n all]? In tis case there is not only an /n/ final in the first reversal, there is an /n/ initial in the second.

Note: One may also be able to pick up [th] and so the word could be [death], but this may not be easy to hear.

In whatever case, there seems to be an underlying message around birth rate and Muslims. Trudeau speaks of Islamophobia in the FS.  [fucked] would mean being in trouble – the birth rate is ‘dead’ with non-Muslims, that is, not sustainable. Or, either non Muslims need to be producing babies, or all the Muslims are doing it [fuckin’]. So, although Trudeau is publicly supportive of Muslim migration, his subconscious speaks of the consequences.
___________________________________________________________________________
RS: Shared assassin
FS: … revealed the secrets behind the assassination …
One will get ‘assassin’ in reverse from ‘assassin’ when there is an /n/ sound that comes before it from a previous FS word (in this case [nd the]). ‘shared’ is also normal behind assassi[nati]on, although quite short, with the [ti] acting as [sh] and the vowel allowing for some sense of sh[are]d. The /d/ comes from the /n/ in the FS. In this case there is an alveolar sound in the example at the start of [sh] giving it a a [ch] sound, so it is closer to [cheered]. This is because there is an /n/ from the FS that occurs, and part of that was included, or it was difficult to separate it from the [sh] for documentation purposes.

This is most likely coincidental sounds.
______________________________________________________________________________
RS: Still surfin’ it terror
FS: the rift in the first place
David noted that the /t. in s[t]ill may not be there after he played it, but accepted it when listening again.
terror – [the rift] This is close. [th] disappears. There is a t-t at the beginning, but reasonably represents the word.
surfin’ it – [in the first] This is acceptable. Final /t/ in ‘it’ is assumed.
still – sounds similar to si-ill. Sense of /t/ is caused by the music only. A close word would be ‘seal’. However, it makes it nonsensical.
There is some merit to surfin’ it terror.

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